VIDEO | How To Rollover Your 401k

Published on Nov 19, 2012 Why do you need to know the details on how to rollover an old 401(k) plan? FULL ARTICLE HERE – http://bit.ly/UP7gZK – The average person holds 11 jobs from the age of 18 to 44, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and for many of us that means 11 or more workplace retirement accounts. Because not all employer plans require you to leave the plan when you leave the company, you could end up with several, disparate retirement accounts. I like to use the analogy of being a babysitter when it comes to orphan 401(k) plans. Every time you leave an old an employer and start with a new, essentially you leave a child in a backyard. If you move between three or four different jobs over five to ten years, that means you’ll have several kids in several different backyards. The real question is how will you be able to babysit all of those kids and ...

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Beneficiary Designations for your IRA

What Beneficiary Designations mean and why they matter… For most people, “estate planning” means drafting documents (such as a Last Will and Testament) that makes sure that your property is managed and distributed according to your wishes.  Drafting documents is the foundation of estate planning, but people who own retirement accounts, life insurance or other assets with beneficiary designations must go one step further.  When you die, the assets in your estate generally fall into one of two categories: probate property or non-probate property.  Probate property is governed by your Last Will and Testament.  Non-probate property, however, passes outside of your Will, and generally passes to a beneficiary named by you when the account or contract was opened. The most common examples of non-probate property are your IRA, 401(k) or life insurance.  These types of assets are non-probate property because they are paid to beneficiaries pursuant to a contract that you create when you open the account or purchase the ...

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Personal Finance 101 – This Week: Do I need a Living Trust?

First, a Living Trust is a trust you set up to hold your property and to govern the use and distribution of your property during your lifetime, during any period when you are incapacitated, and even after your death (when it acts much like a Last Will and Testament). You can amend or revoke a Living Trust at any time during your life making it a very flexible planning tool. Due to their broad scope and flexibility, Living Trusts are often viewed as one of the most comprehensive estate planning documents. But do you really need a Living Trust? If you answer YES to any of these questions, you may want to consider one. 1. Do you own property in multiple states? After you die, your family or other legal representatives must go through the probate process in each state where you own property in your name. The time, hassle and expense of probate in multiple other states can be ...

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