Are Charitable Deductions Going To Be Wiped Out Under Trump?

For many American families who prepare for year end tax planning, no discussion is complete without talking about charitable contributions.   Many families make charitable contributions by tithing a percentage of their family income, giving cash to local charities, or they end up taking non-cash items from their household and donating them to a worthy charity.  With the potential shake up in the tax law under a Trump regime, will you have your charitable contributions completely wiped out in 2017? First things first.   You don’t really need to worry about charitable contributions if you don’t itemize your deductions at all.  Today, a single filer has a $6,300 standard deduction and a married couple has $12,600 for a standard deduction. In addition, you get to deduct you, your spouse, and your children as personal exemptions on your tax return.  The suggested policy going forward would be to wipe out the personal exemptions and offer a larger standard deduction of $15,000 for a ...

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What Does Steph Curry’s Mouthguard Teach Us About Investing?

It’s playoff basketball time and this past week we saw all kinds of buzzer beaters from Derrick Rose and Paul Pierce in some really exciting games. The NBA loves statistics, and I love looking at those statistics and thinking about what it may mean when it comes to your money. So, how the heck does the mouthguard that newly crowned MVP Stephen Curry wears and investing wind up in the same category? This is where the ‘your smart money moves’ column takes everyday life and turns it into valuable money making lessons. The Wall Street Journal (source wsj.com) did a recent study looking at all of Steph Curry’s 337 free throws taking during the course of the NBA Season. With the Mouthguard out, Curry shot 198 for 214 from the free throw line which is a 92.5% shooting percentage. With the Mouthguard in, Curry shot 110 for 123 which is an 89.4% shooting percentage. The real difference between these two ...

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Ted Jenkin discusses financial advice with the Wall Street Journal

You Must Remember This… The one sentence financial advisers wish their clients would remember… (source) Looking for financial advice you can actually remember? Something simple, pithy, but useful? We asked some financial advisers to sum up in one sentence the most important advice they could give clients to help them better manage their financial lives. Here’s what they said: TED JENKIN Co-CEO and Founder, oXYGen Financial Inc., Alpharetta, Ga. THE LINE: “You must always pay yourself first.” THE REASON: Mr. Jenkin says many people don’t realize they are the chief executive officer of their family finances. “As CEO of your family finances, you should always pay yourself first by putting 10% to 20% of your income toward your financial goals before you pay your expenses,” he says. If you can’t meet expenses after savings, it indicates you’re living beyond your means. He also recommends putting at least one-third of every pay raise into savings. “If you follow the ‘pay yourself ...

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