Retirement Assumptions: What’s Your Legacy Goal?

When you are building out your long term retirement plan, a financial advisor will often have to make many different types of assumptions. I have authored numerous articles around this topic. You need to consider market downside risk, interest rate risk, inflation risk, liquidity risk, tax risk, sequencing risk, and several others. Often, one major mistake made around the discussion regarding building a quality retirement plan is actually having the end in mind. What do you want your legacy to be when you pass on? This is a crucial conversation to have at the onset of your overall comprehensive financial plan. Consider this for a moment. If you tell your financial advisor nothing, he or she will likely build out your retirement plan analysis by using a ‘death age’. From the conversations you have with your planner or from some default number in the financial planning software, you will arrive a set age usually in the 85 to 90 range. ...

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Personal Finance 101: Generation X Series – A Vacation Or College Education

Generation X is classically defined at people born between the years 1965 and 1979.    Pretty much those of you in your early 30’s to the mid 40’s.  However, having given personal financial advice to thousands of people, I can tell you that many of you who were born 1960 to 1964 fit within the Generation X type of financial and personal attitude.   Since I am 42 and have had a good deal of financial success, I’ve noticed some big mistakes that I see my generation making with their money and how they think about money.    This week I wanted to discuss the mistake of spending too much on vacations and not enough saving for college education. Where do you think we should take the kids away for spring break this year?      Should we go away for Thanksgiving or would it be better during the holiday season?    I know the children have sports and camps over the summer, but wouldn’t it ...

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We are married and don’t discuss money!

When you get married and take your vows, it goes something like this. I take you to be my lawful wife/husband/partner, to have and to hold, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and health, until death do us part. It does say for richer or poorer, but unfortunately many couples across America just don’t spend time discussing money.  More often than not today, I see separate accounts, unmerged finances, and she pays this and I pay that. I’ve been married for over sixteen years, and while I am the one that predominately handles the money, there is nothing hidden in our financial relationship.  The more secretive and separate things are in a financial relationship, the worse it always turns out to be whether it be your household or in business partnership. I have the same kind of relationship with my business partner. It’s true that each partner needs to have some independence, so it is very ...

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9 financial tips for Generation Y

9 financial tips for Generation Y. Perhaps not surprisingly, more than half of employees between 21 and 32 say that they're living paycheck to paycheck, according to a recent survey by insurer Metlife. Nearly three-fourths of respondents are concerned about making ends meet. Fortunately, you can get off to a sound financial start with these nine tips. ...

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