Where Should You Be Investing In 2019?

As 2018 comes to a close, most of you will be more than happy to wipe away the last three months of stock market woes.  With interest rates sure to climb up more in 2019, uncertainty with the China trade wars, and a looming national debt, it has many investors wondering where the best place is to put your money in 2019.  While nobody can predict the future, it’s important to review how you are investing your money relative to your goals, objectives, time frames, risk tolerances, tax brackets, etc. In 2018, we saw far too many people who were older and had too much money in the stock market.  It’s important to remember to ‘act your age’ and in general you should look at the rule of 100.  If you are 60 years old, roughly 60 percent of your portfolio should be in safer more secure type investments and 40 percent in equity or investments that carry more risk.  ...

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How To Organize Your 2014 Budget

Even though exercise and diet remain the top two New Year’s resolutions that most Americans have, the next few days might provide you with some opportunity to visit your overall 2014 spending plan.  It can be a painful process sometimes building out a spending plan (or budget) as your self-reflection may often reveal ugly spots that you just don’t want to see. The first and most important step toward a financially successful 2014 is to get a reality check around where your dollars and cents were actually spent in 2013.   Here are my six tips on how to organize and set up a household budget.  This is the bedrock of what has created a successful personal financial plan for my household for many years. Gather The Last 12 Months Of Fixed Expenses– Fixed expenses are generally expenses that do not change much over the course of the year.  An example of this would be your rent or mortgage.  Most of ...

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Personal Finance 101 – College Education Planning – What Are Your Assumptions?

You get home from work one day and your child has the magical letter to open from that college or university that you both always dreamed they would attend.   It’s possible the school is your alma mater or perhaps it is the Ivy League university you always thought your child was possible of being a part of for the next four years.   As you open the letter, you read that your child has been ‘accepted’ into the new freshmen class.  You begin to realize that maybe you haven’t done your homework on how you are going to pay for the college education.  Over the next four weeks, I will examine some of key areas you need to be thinking about when you plan for this type of financial goal. Many financial plans that I see done on families often use blanket assumptions.   When you start thinking about college education planning, it is important to have lengthy discussion with your financial ...

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