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The Drug Of Buying ‘Stuff’

The weather is warm and in the United States we are about to start enjoying some of the national pastimes of our country.   We love things like baseball, apple pie, the 4th of July, and grilling out in our backyards.    Oh yeah, and we also LOVE spending money.    In recent years, I’ve noticed that spending is more than just making a purchase here and there.  It’s almost a ‘crack’ like addiction, whether you wait for that Amazon package at the door or to take a photo of your tricked out new ride to post up on Facebook.   Like it or not, many Americans are addicted to the drug of buying ‘stuff’.    Why is this and how can you get your patterns changed on the home front? It seems pretty apparent that ease of access to drugs can make a user want more of them.  In our spending patterns, the ease of credit, access to our cash, and online transactions with ...

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What will you do with 2% more in your paycheck?

If Santa Clause didn’t come down your chimney with anything good this year, Congress has decided to give you a stocking stuffer for the New Year.   With nearly 160 million workers that will benefit from the extension of the reduced payroll tax that passed just before Christmas, it’s time to figure out whether you’ll be naughty or nice with your gift.   The Temporary Payroll Tax Cut Continuation Act temporarily extends the two percentage point payroll tax cut for employees, continuing the reduction of your Social Security withholding rate from 6.2% to 4.2% of wages paid through February 29th, 2012.  (source: www.irs.gov) Of course, this is supposed to have no effect on your future Social Security benefits.  Yeah, right! If you weren’t aware, this payroll tax cut was in effect for all of 2011.   This means that for those who earned W-2 income last year up to your first $106,800 of waged income, you actually got a 2% pay raise in ...

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Ted Jenkin discusses financial advice with the Wall Street Journal

You Must Remember This… The one sentence financial advisers wish their clients would remember… (source) Looking for financial advice you can actually remember? Something simple, pithy, but useful? We asked some financial advisers to sum up in one sentence the most important advice they could give clients to help them better manage their financial lives. Here’s what they said: TED JENKIN Co-CEO and Founder, oXYGen Financial Inc., Alpharetta, Ga. THE LINE: “You must always pay yourself first.” THE REASON: Mr. Jenkin says many people don’t realize they are the chief executive officer of their family finances. “As CEO of your family finances, you should always pay yourself first by putting 10% to 20% of your income toward your financial goals before you pay your expenses,” he says. If you can’t meet expenses after savings, it indicates you’re living beyond your means. He also recommends putting at least one-third of every pay raise into savings. “If you follow the ‘pay yourself ...

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