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These tips will help you max out your retirement contributions this year

As the calendar crosses the mid-year mark, are you on track to reach your retirement savings goals? The IRS has raised the limits for what you can put away in pre-tax retirement savings account this year. That means you can sock away as much as $19,000 in your 401(k), 403(b), Thrift Savings Plan and most 457 plans, up from $18,500 in 2018. You can also save as much as $6,000 in an IRA, up from $5,500 in 2018. If you’re age 50 and over, you can put in an additional $6,000 in your 401(k) and other employee plans and another $1,000 in your IRA. Even if your personal savings will be nowhere near those limits, now is a great time to check on whether your savings rates will get you to your goals for this year and beyond. Read full article here: ...

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The Biggest Changes To The U.S. Retirement System In 10 Years

This hasn’t become law yet, but in a sweeping house bill known as SECURE (Setting Every Community Up For Retirement), new legislation is coming that will be the most sweeping changes we have ever had to our retirement system in more than a decade.  The house passed the vote recently 417-3, and it doesn’t look like there is much impeding the process from the Senate or even President Trump.  So, what do these changes mean to your wallet? Annuities May Hit Your 401(k) Soon Over the past 25 years, we’ve seen pensions offered by companies dwindle down to a microscopic level.   While more and more baby boomers and Gen X’ers worry about saving enough for retirement, there is no real great option in 401(k)’s to guarantee someone a lifetime income.  Target funds were designed to help make it easier to choose simple investments in your 401(k), but this legislation would now allow 401(k) providers to offer an annuity as an ...

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The Three Most Important Letters In Retirement R M D

What is a required minimum distribution? (*) You’ll sometimes hear that you have important financial decisions to make when you turn the age of 70 ½.  The IRS has never seen a nickel of tax revenue on account you may have started in your early 20’s, so now they are wanting to get their due.  An RMD or required minimum distribution is the amount that the tax laws require you to take out of certain types of retirement accounts once you reach the age of 70 ½. If you have a traditional IRA, a 401(k) account, 403(b), or other types of retirement plans, then you’ll generally have to start taking RMDs once the provisions of the law kick in. The rules apply to certain inherited retirement accounts as well, so be very careful when you inherit an IRA. Required minimum distributions must be made in cash, and you’re generally required to complete the withdrawal by the end of the calendar ...

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Four Ways Your Kids Can Ruin Your Retirement

Retirement generally only happens one time in our life.  It is that transition period where we hope our work, parental, and personal responsibilities dissipate to the point where we only have to worry about ourselves.  It is a time in our lives where we don’t have to be on a time clock, don’t have to worry about checking e-mail, and there are no meetings that we have to be at on the schedule of someone else. Nobody really tells you what kinds of responsibilities come with having children until you actually have a child.  You work hard to raise your child the right way, and you hope one day that they will be a fully self-sufficient individual.  Your greatest fear may be your own children’s failure to launch.  Here are four ways your children can ruin your retirement: Their Debt Becomes Your Guilt Many parents believe it is their responsibility to make sure their child graduates college with no debt.  ...

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How Do You Know When To Sell A Stock

You have owned one of those amazing technology stocks over the last decade and you are beginning to wonder…is it time for me get rid of this stock?  Or, should you hold on to it like your parents or grandparents held on to their blue chip stocks until the day they passed it on to you?   Maybe you just bought one of those blazing marijuana stocks and made a nifty profit and are thinking you should sell it because it may just be a fad.  Just like sitting down at the Blackjack table in Las Vegas, we all know how to pull up a seat at the bar, we know how to place some bets, but if we start winning most of us don’t have a strategy about when is the right time to cash in your chips. It’s interesting to see the different philosophies that reside on the internet today.  The Motley Fool, one of the largest investment websites ...

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Are You A Sole Proprietor: The Three S’s For Retirement

In today’s ‘gig economy’ more and more individuals are picking up some sort of side hustle to improve their financial situation.  Along with that trend, people in their mid 50’s are stepping away from their corporate jobs in the search of freedom and flexibility to start their own consulting LLC’s.  This new plethora of part time and full-time entrepreneurs leaves a maze of dizzying choices on what kind of potential retirement plan is available when you own a brand new business. One easy way to remember what kinds of retirement plans are available to you is to remember the three S’s of retirement which are SIMPLE IRA plans, a SEP IRA plans, and a Solo 401(k) plans. The SIMPLE IRA Plan The SIMPLE IRA Plan is a simple, easy to set up retirement where an employee may defer up to $13,000 in 2019. Employees age 50 or over can make a catch-up contribution of up to $3,000. The salary reduction ...

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How to Have a Proactive Retirement Plan

Ted Jenkin, ranked the #4 Financial Advisor in the U.S. by Investopedia, took some time to chat with us to discuss the importance of saving income, investing wisely and preparing for retirement. It’s no joke that America is not prepared for retirement. Emotional spending is rampant in our consumerist and social-media-driven culture, and sadly many seniors are relying on Social Security to get them through retirement. Many people are living longer in the 21st century with technology and healthcare advances and a meager savings is not enough income to sustain a happy day-to-day retirement lifestyle. Ted Jenkin, founder and CEO of oXYGen Financial, comments: “People are unequivocally not saving enough for their futures. They succumb to lifestyle inflation, which means – in theory – that their income expands. The problem is that expenses have a tendency to expand for more luxurious lifestyles as they make more money. One of the main culprits is social media, as there is peer pressure and images of luxurious vacations, gourmet dining, ...

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Does Your Business Need A Buy-Sell Agreement?

Entrepreneurs are generally good at one thing when they start their business and that’s generating top line revenue.  Once they create enough top line revenue then they begin to think about how to drive bottom line profitability in their business.  As the equity value of the company grows, most owners never consider some very important planning items because they believe they are invincible.  What happens if my business partner(s) get divorced? What if they die?  What if they become disabled?  Do I want to be working with my partners kids or spouse?   One of the key considerations for most business owners is whether or not to get a buy-sell agreement and get key person insurance. A buy-sell agreement is a legal contract that provides for the sale of an owner’s stake in a business at a ‘trigger’ event.  The sale of an owner’s interest could actually trigger for many reasons including retirement, death, disability, divorce, bankruptcy, or even a conflict ...

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7 Retirement Shirts I Won’t Be Wearing

When it comes to retirement, many people talk about how much of a lump sum they will need to make work optional. They discuss their future plans full of travel, golf, grandchildren, and giving back to charity. We often hear of the dreams of starting the business they always wanted to run and starting the volunteer work they never had the time for when they were working full time.  Over the past twenty-six years, I’ve seen many people retire and helped many retire successfully. At the risk of offending someone out there (because I am sure I will) I spent a few days up in New Jersey over the Fourth Of July and I saw a lot of bad shirts.  I mean really bad shirts.  Don’t know why it got me to this off the beaten path retirement topic, but I thought I would share my list of seven shirts you’ll never see me wearing during retirement.  Remember, if you ...

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