fbpx

These tips will help you max out your retirement contributions this year

As the calendar crosses the mid-year mark, are you on track to reach your retirement savings goals? The IRS has raised the limits for what you can put away in pre-tax retirement savings account this year. That means you can sock away as much as $19,000 in your 401(k), 403(b), Thrift Savings Plan and most 457 plans, up from $18,500 in 2018. You can also save as much as $6,000 in an IRA, up from $5,500 in 2018. If you’re age 50 and over, you can put in an additional $6,000 in your 401(k) and other employee plans and another $1,000 in your IRA. Even if your personal savings will be nowhere near those limits, now is a great time to check on whether your savings rates will get you to your goals for this year and beyond. Read full article here: ...

Read More →

Mortgage Rates The Lowest In One Year: Is It Time For You To Consider A Refinance?

With the Fed recently raising interest rates, people have already started to write and call me about whether or not it is still a good time to refinance.  You will likely see more offers from your current mortgage company, broker, or bank looking to get you locked in before the Fed raises rates again in 2019.  Here are my smart money moves for three key points to know when you make a final decision about whether a refinance is good for your property. There Is NO Rule Of Thumb – I love these random articles out there that say your mortgage rates need to be down by a certain percentage for a refinance to make sense. In fact, Investopedia recently wrote, “The typical rule of thumb is that if you can reduce your current interest rate by 0.75-1%.” This makes very little sense to me as this is going to be a math equation, because all refinancing costs money.   What you are ultimately ...

Read More →

How To Teach Your 5 year Old About Money.

We do a poor job of teaching our kids about money in this country. In order to get my kid started in the right direction I set up the following system. I threw out my son’s piggy bank and gave him three jars. I labeled one, money to spend, one money to save, and one money to give. I told him any time he got any money he had to split it into thirds. Then I explained that he could use the spend jar money on anything he wanted. I would never question what he wanted to spend that money on. The money to save jar could never be touched. And the money to give jar was not only for church offerings but when he got invited to friends birthday parties he had to buy the birthday presents with his money to give jar. (I was tired of spending my money on his friend’s presents). I was amazing to see ...

Read More →

The Biggest Investment Mistake You Make Every Year

We all know that investments can be for short term, medium term, or long term.   Investments are often thought of in terms of stocks, bonds, mutual funds, real estate, etc.    Some people invest their money in private ventures and some in public companies.   Business owners will almost always tell you the best investment is their business.   In my opinion, the biggest investment mistake each and every person makes on a yearly basis is not setting aside enough of their personal income to invest in themselves.   Investing in yourself can be personally, professionally, and financially rewarding.   Here are my top five ways to invest in YOU! Advance Your Education- There are so many outlets today to gain extra knowledge and education.  It doesn’t have to be done necessarily by going back to school full time.   You could do a three day executive course or just sign up for one night class.  You could take an online course on a site like ...

Read More →

You Lost $24 Billion In 16 Days Mr. Government?

According to the USA Today (10/18/2013), the 16 day Government shutdown cost the economy jobs, delayed mortgages, and lost retail sales.  The numbers aren’t fully in yet, but it is purported to be at least 12 billion dollars and possibly as much as 24 billion dollars for the stalemate that took place in Washington, D.C. over the past several weeks. As a 22 year veteran financial advisor, you don’t advise someone to take out a Target store card right after they have maxed out their Sears and Nordstrom store cards.   We all know that piling up lots and lots of credit card debt is simply an unsustainable way to manage a financial budget.  What we all don’t know today is when the balloon will burst. It’s not a smart money move to lose 12 billion, let alone 24 billion, but I’ve come up with my list of things that we could have done with 24 billion. We could have handed ...

Read More →