Are Charitable Deductions Going To Be Wiped Out Under Trump?

For many American families who prepare for year end tax planning, no discussion is complete without talking about charitable contributions.   Many families make charitable contributions by tithing a percentage of their family income, giving cash to local charities, or they end up taking non-cash items from their household and donating them to a worthy charity.  With the potential shake up in the tax law under a Trump regime, will you have your charitable contributions completely wiped out in 2017? First things first.   You don’t really need to worry about charitable contributions if you don’t itemize your deductions at all.  Today, a single filer has a $6,300 standard deduction and a married couple has $12,600 for a standard deduction. In addition, you get to deduct you, your spouse, and your children as personal exemptions on your tax return.  The suggested policy going forward would be to wipe out the personal exemptions and offer a larger standard deduction of $15,000 for a ...

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Will You Lose Your Home Mortgage Deduction In 2013?

Last Friday, I spent a chunk of my day at the Georgia Regional Financial Planning Association conference. I was a panelist at the event, but one of the reasons I attended was to see a friend of mine Michael Kitces speak on all of the tax law changes here in 2013. He is one of the best tax management advisors that I know of in the industry. As I have shared before in my blogs, tax management will be as important if not more important than asset management over the next decade. With all of the recent fiscal cliff changes, the tax law has become even more complicated and requires a close eye here in 2013 when income to tracking your gross income, capital gain sales, and potentially triggering out things like stock options or selling a piece of rental real estate. One of the main questions taxpayers will face this this year is whether or not their home mortgage ...

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4 Tax Law Changes We Need To Make Permanent

With the presidential election beginning to heat up in America over the next several months, we are all going to hear a lot about income taxes.  We all know that with thousands of pages of tax code, it is impossible for the average citizen to really understand all of the different ways they can save money in taxes.  There are many tax law changes set to take effect in 2013.   If I had the opportunity to set the wheels in motion to make some tax law changes that would be permanent and easy to understand, here are four of them that I would recommend we change to become permanent. 1. Social Security Taxation –   From the day you begin working and earning waged income, 6.2% of your paycheck (the last couple of years 4.2%) goes toward your future social security benefits.    This is also known as your Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA) tax.     You only see the 6.2% that comes ...

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America’s Healthy Future Act

Major Provisions of Finance Committee’s America’s Healthy Future Act (source: Taylor, English, Duma LLP) Excise Tax on High-Cost Insurance Policies. An excise tax of 40 percent would be imposed on insurance premiums in excess of $8,000 for individuals and $21,000 for families. For individuals with high-risk jobs or those over age 55 and not enrolled in Medicare, the threshold would be $9,850 for individuals and $26,000 for families. The threshold would be indexed to the consumer price index for urban consumers (CPI-U) plus 1 percentage point. Tax Credit to Buy Insurance. Beginning in 2013, tax credits would be available to help offset the cost of private health insurance premiums. The credits would be paid directly to insurers. The credits would be based on the percentage of income the cost of premiums represents, rising from 2 percent of income for those at 100 percent of the poverty line to 12 percent of income for those at 300 percent of poverty. Individuals ...

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